Explore and Endure, Woodbridge Stake YW Camp 2016

By Camille Kerr and Amy Buongiovanni

Girl Camp 2016 Group in TShirts

“Explore and Endure” is exactly what the Woodbridge Stake Young Women did at a new location for Girls Camp 2016: Verdun Adventure Bound in Rixeyville, VA.  From June 27th to July 1st the girls participated in many new and exciting adventures, physically and spiritually.

Some of their first explorations were in setting up their own tents and cooking all their meals outdoors, which were new challenges for most of the girls and many leaders. They also befriended the horses at the camp, learned to ride, and learned to fish.  Verdun offered other fun activities to the girls such as kayaking and swimming in the lake, volleyball, craft activities, and swimming in the pool.

 

Girls Camp 2016 kayaking

The young women tested their endurance in the challenge course, where they played team building games and helped each other with the zip line and bungee swing.  Tiana Kelley from the Quantico Ward said, ““Girls camp is awesome because all of the girls in the stake come together to help each other and encourage each other no matter who you are.”  And this is exactly what they did in the team building games and the challenge courses.  One of the favorite team building games involved working as a team to get every member across the pretend acid river, by only stepping on the three safe spots.

Girls Camp 2016 Team Building

For part of the challenge course they climbed a very tall pole.  The reward of their endurance and strength at the top of the pole was the thrill of riding the longest zip line in VA!  Another thrilling adventure was the bungee swing where team members pulled together to raise the swinger high in the air.  The swinger then released themselves and soared through the air.   Aleen Gonzalez of the Quantico Ward said, “Girls camp was very fun and was a great opportunity to conquer the challenge course.”

Girls Camp 2016 Challenge Course 2Girls Camp 2016 Swing

Each specific camp level had time with their leaders, passing off the camp requirements such as cooking, first aid, knots, and fire building. They also participated in service projects with their levels and each ward also received the opportunity to entertain by performing skits with their wards.

Girls Cammp 2016 4th Year Adventure

Kim Blair from the Lake Ridge 1st Ward, arranged a special Stake night.  Each ward received a special box in the morning with a beautifully painted Liahona and a scroll. The girls opened the scroll at 7:00 pm that evening and then were directed to three different stations with their wards.  At each station a speaker shared a spiritual message.  At one station they learned about enduring in personal situations and how little achievements are important in our lives.  Another station taught them to explore, specifically how exploring spiritually will strengthen their testimonies.  The last station taught them how Patriarchal blessings can be a personal Liahona.

The final scroll instructed them to meet at the amphitheater.  As the girls arrived there it began pouring rain, which miraculously and thankfully stopped after a ten minute wait.   The young women were then treated to inspiring music from a group of young women who stepped right out of the audience and sang a lovely arrangement of “If the Savior Stood Beside Me” while a slide show with pictures of the Savior was presented.

Debbie Roderick, the Woodbridge Stake Young Women’s President, shared some concluding remarks focusing on the spiritual symbolism of the journey they had just taken.  The girls had collected special rocks from each station, which Sister Roderick used to teach them how the Savior can be their rock and foundation.
The spirit of the evening was then enhanced by a traditional Girls Camp nighttime activity called Singing Trees. Each ward chose a tree to stand around, and when it was that ward’s turn to sing, all of the girls and leaders turned their flashlights up towards the tree. When they finished singing, they turned the flashlights off and the next tree lit up as the next ward sang.  Of the many spiritual experiences at camp, one young woman said, “It was so lit…Because of the spirit.”

Of course Bishop’s Night and testimony meeting contained evidence of how the young women endured and explored throughout the week of camp.  So many girls shared their testimonies about how much they had felt the spirit at camp, and about how the challenge course had really helped them grow and accomplish new things.  For example, Faith Oryang from the Quantico ward said, “This year was my favorite year because I got to experience a new camp site, new adventures, and conquer my fears while putting my trust in the Lord, although I was terrified.”  Quite a few girls who were not members of the church stood and shared their feelings as well. The evening was a spiritual highlight of the week of exploring and enduring.

 

Special Journey for Woodbridge Stake Youth to Historic Kirtland

by Ian M. Houston 
Woodbridge Stake Director of Public Affairs
Youth of the Woodbridge Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Lattter-day Saints journeyed to historic Kirtland, Ohio for Youth Conference the week of July 28-30.
Woodbridge Stake Youth at the Kirtland temple

Woodbridge Stake Youth at the Kirtland Temple

Speaking from inside the Kirtland Temple to the youth on Thursday evening, Woodbridge Stake President Clark Price said, “The Lord wanted each of you here.” Stake First Counselor Val Hilton reflected in his remarks on how inspired it was for the Woodbridge Stake to have made this journey and that it came from inspiration that President Price received. Evening speakers included stake youth leaders and Latter-day Saint author and long-time Ohio resident Karl Ricks Anderson. Brother Anderson brought to light with humor and a deep understanding the unparalleled events and divine manifestations that were given during those early years of church history. Construction on the first Mormon temple was started on June 6, 1833 and the building was dedicated on March 27, 1836. In his dedicatory prayer, President Joseph Smith asked “that all people who shall enter upon the threshold of the Lord’s house may feel thy power.” 
 
Audrey Scott, 17, of the Lake Ridge I Ward said of the trip: “It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to broaden my perceptive on the hardships of the early pioneers.”
Youth Conference 2016
“The stone quarry was a very cool system of engineering and science,” said Dallin Gulick, 14, of the Quantico Ward after the group toured the quarry where marks in the stone can still be seen. The youth also toured sights sacred to Mormon history including the Isaac Morley Farm, the Johnson Home, and the Newel K. and Ann Whitney home and store.
Saturday held a special opportunity for the youth to bear testimony of the experience and express what it meant to them. Many youth mentioned the evening temple experience as particularly moving.
Kirtland
 
Planning for the Youth Conference commenced over a year ago. The Young Women’s and Young Men’s Stake Leadership spent countless hours refining and revising details. Stake Young Women’s President Debbie Roderick said on the journey home on Saturday evening, “It was amazing to be in Kirtland with the youth and to feel their excitement and awe as we walked where the Prophet Joseph walked and visited rooms where God the Father and his son, Jesus Christ stood.” She added, “they are the future leaders in our church and they are strong!”

Woodbridge Stake Engages with Local Muslim Leaders

Representatives of the Woodbridge Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints attended a Ramadan dinner at the Dar Alnoor Islamic Community Center in Manassas on June 14, 2016.

The gathering brought together a number of different religious faiths, faith based coalitions, community leaders, and government officials during the sacred month for Muslims of Ramadan.

Ian Houston, Woodbridge Stake Director of Public Affairs said, “It was an honor to participate and be so graciously welcomed by our Muslim neighbors and friends and we look forward to continuing to deepen the partnership.”

Mormons and Muslims regularly work together to support family and religious freedom issues. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is a long-time partner with Muslim charitable organizations like International Islamic Relief Organization.

Ian Houston and Imam Jemal

Ian Houston and Imam Jemal

Woodbridge Stake Camporee 2016

Story by Patrick Wells

Campers began arriving on the 23rd of March to BSA Camp Snyder.  There was a total of about 60 campers including adults and youth.

The goal of the Camporee was to give the scouters a chance to learn about mass casualty triaging and treatment.  We were fortunate to have some of Prince William Counties experts provide the training.

Training included: Incident Command systems, How to triage, and first aid including treating burns, transporting of the injured, cardio pulmonary resuscitation and open wound care with tourniquets.

camporee 2016 3

Scouts were given a short primer on how to be good victims in preparation for the afternoon events.

Two mock mass casualty events were conducted. Scouts were judged on their use of the morning training and leadership uses of the incident command system.

camporee 2016 2camporee

 

The night ended with a cooking contest and message from President Price on the importance of the scouting as it helps with missionary preparation and priesthood efforts.

Aloha!

By Camille Kerr

Writing Specialist on the Woodbridge, Virginia Stake Public Affairs Council for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints

Aloha!  The Polynesian culture is alive and well in the Woodbridge Stake.  Saturday evening, April 30th, the Quantico Ward hosted a Luau complete with a roasted pig, Polynesian entertainment and a Samoan fire knife dance.  This incredible Luau was thanks to members with Polynesian background from not only the Quantico Ward, but also the Woodbridge 1st ward and the Young Single Adult Branch.

Tahiti Dance

Quantico Ward families with Polynesian background include the Travis family, the Brash family, and the Anakalea family. The Travis family was integral in the planning of the Luau, putting together decorations and cooking food.  Brother Maui Travis is from Kaneohe, Hawai’i and his wife Patricia was born in Kahuku, raised in Hau’ula, Hawai’i, and is Filipina (Visayan-Ilocano).

Luau decorations

The Brash family also helped, providing food and decorations and their daughter Sulieti performed the Tongan tau’olunga as part of the entertainment.  Sister Tita Brash is from the island of Tonga, the only remaining monarchy in the South Pacific.  She explained that Tonga became known as the friendly islands because of the warm greetings received by Captain James Cook back in 1773.

She said, “We are a very proud people. Not in the material riches of the world but in our heritage and culture. And I believe Sulieti lived up to that as she has been sick the last few days and still wanted to perform and share a part of her Tongan culture with her ward family. And it was her very first performance ever.”

Sulieti

Crowning the Luau feast was a whole roasted pig, along with authentic Polynesian dishes such as Chicken Long Rice, Huli Huli Chicken, Hawaiian Mac Salad, Banana Bread, & Ambrosia Salad, which were provided by Quantico Ward Relief Society members thanks to recipes from the Brash, Travis, and Anakalea families.  Each of these families also cooked and shared food from their islands; the Brashes made Haupia, the Anakaleas made Pork Pimientos and Chantilly Cake, the Travis family made rice and the Brash & Faumuina families made Lupulu.

The highlight of the evening was the entertainment provided by the Polynesian Fusion Entertainment.  Sister Lagi Faumuina of the Woodbridge 1st Ward, the director of the group, began the entertainment with a hula hoop contest for various groups: Primary girls, primary boys, Young Women, Young Men, Relief Society Sisters, Elders Quorum, and the Quantico Ward Bishopric along with Stake Presidency members President Clark Price and President David Oryang who arrived just in time for his part in the contest.    A primary girl, Lauren Basham, beat them all with the longest hula hooping of all the groups.  The most entertaining group was the Bishopric and Stake Presidency members.

Hula Hoop Contest

Faumuina as director of Polynesian Fusion Entertainment introduced and participated in a myriad of dances native to the islands of Tonga, Hawaii, Samoa, Tahiti, and Fiji.  She said that she formed the group in 2015 with her friend Siela Ulugalu-Shirley, who is Samoan, from Manu’a in Am Samoa.  Their goal is to, “try and keep our culture alive and blend other cultures to come together as one. Being that we are a long ways from home, we feel it is our duty and responsibility to teach our children where they come from and who they are.”

Polynesian Fusion Entertainment

Faumuina was born and raised in Hawaii and grew up on the North Shore and experienced the life at the Polynesian Cultural Center. She said, “I’m from Oahu and pretty much spent most of my life around BYU-Hawaii because my grandfather and mother attended school there.  Today, I still have family members that are employed with PCC.  I come from a long line of dancers and entertainers so it’s really in my blood.”

Samoan Dance

Several of the dances were performed by Faumuina’s daughter and Ulugalu-Shirley’s daughters.  Pictured below are the girls at the Luau from left to right: Myrah Ulugalu-Shirley (12), Leilani Faumuina-Carr (11), Natalia Ulugalu-Shirley (10), and Serenity Ulugalu-Shirley (8).  Wearing native costumes to represent each dance, they performed dances from Tonga, Hawaii, Samoa, Tahiti and Fiji.

 

PFE girls in Hawaiian dress

The men of the group astounded the audience with their warrior dances: a solo dance by Faumuina’s son, Darrell Posten, and a group warrior dance with Darrell; Dwight Ulugalu-Shirley, who is Siela’s husband, the father of the 3 girls and from Jamaica; and Phetta Konelio, who attends the Young Single Adults branch in the Quantico Ward.

Warrior Dance 2

Phetta’s full name is Fetalaigalelei Pupu Konelio and he was born in Tahiti.  He said that he is “of Samoan, Tongan, Hawaiian, Tahitian, and Bulgarian heritage.” Faumuina explained her connection with him.  “I sent for him to come to Hawaii to have a better opportunity at life. Life adventures had us ending up in the East Coast.” He is a convert to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served as a missionary in Arizona, speaking fluent Spanish.

Sulieti Brash is new to the group and she is 8. Missing from the group on the night of the Luau were Faumuina’s 2 sons Joseph Poston (16) and Cory L. Faumuina-Carr (12) and her business partner Siela Ulugalu-Shirley.

The Polynesian Fusion Entertainment group has performed at birthdays, corporate events, and luau parties.  They even performed at Montclair Day last year with another group. They are looking forward to being a part of the Around the World Cultural Food Festival at the Washington D.C. Mall in June and they have a performance this month at the Fiesta Asia.

Phetta blowing the conch shell

Konelio opened the entertainment with the traditional blowing of the conch shell and concluded the evening outside the building with an amazing Samoan fire knife dance called “Siva afi”, tossing, twirling and dancing with fiery flames. The Quantico Ward members extend a huge thank you to all those who put together the Luau and provided the entertainment. Dance